LONG LIVE CLARITY!

Steve Savage
translated by Simon Brown




1.

Claire, a D-day crush.

2.

D for Daisy. Marguerite or Claire?

3.

Or: défonce, déchire, écrase, morcelle, casse, fauche, bats, broie and brouille.

4.

Found on the curbside.

5.

Medics stick her in a milky sickwagon.

6.

Or stash her in the trash.


7.

Flesh, la chair, a chair…

8.

Thought it was the seat of thought.

9.

Fell out of my chair.

10.

Chair for a dame of yore.

11.

Dainty feet and shapely chair, Daisy’s yellow.

12.

Clearly not Claire crushed on the curb.

13.

Claire’s name is Claire.

14.

Sickwagon and trashbin, white and white.

15.

Can’t white out yellow with this white.

16.

Off-white.

17.

Dirty blond.

18.

An odd bird, yellow.

19.

Odd meaning curious meaning strange.

20.

Yellow of belly, belly of laugh.

21.

Yellow of teeth.

22.

Chicken yellow, no blackbird.

23.

Two blackbird eggs.

24.

Two yellow yolks to you.

25.

Needed three, but two sounds better.

26.

Don’t know who I am anymore.

27.

Signed X, Claire’s name.


28.

I’m Claire.

29.

Next to my chair.

30.

I don’t lay eggs.

31.

Can’t pondre, but can ponder.

32.

Merle is a blackbird, unpearly black.

33.

Merle is almost merde is almost perle. A pearl?

34.

Pearl hides parle: express yourself!


35.

Break out of that shell!

36.

Put your love to the test!


37.

A shell is a coquille is an eggcorn.


38.

My sequence is over, just about.

39.

Sunny-side, or belly up?


40.

Claire’s getting dizzy.

41.

Passes out.


42.

Falls down the stairs.

43.

Falls in love with her orthodontist.


44.

Braces on teeth all askew.

45.

Takes a bad apple bite.

46.

Life is, life is…

47.

Claire, spit it out!


48.

…life. La-laa, laa-la-la.

49.

Life is life.

50.

La-laa, laa-la-la.


LONG LIVE CLARITY! is a translation of VIVE LA CLARTÉ !, originally published in Montréal poet Steve Savage’s collection Mina Pam Dick, Traver Pam Dick, Nico Pam Dick et Gregoire Pam Dick (Le Quartanier, 2016), itself having evolved from a failed translation of NYC poet Pam Dick’s Delinquent (Futurepoem, 2009) and ultimately taking the form of (in his own words) “a reinvention of myself through the reinventions of Pam Dick”.


VIVE LA CLARTÉ  !



1

Claire qu’écrase un jour J.


2

J pour jaune.

3

Smash, mash, slash, squash, swat, crush, slam, crunch, crack, mow et jam, dit l’anglais.

4

On trouve l’ado sur le bord du trottoir.

5

Des préposés la déposent dans une ambulance blanche.

6

Non, dans une benne à ordures.

7

La chair, a chair, la chaise…

8

Le siège de la pensée.

9

Tomber de sa chaise.

10

Une chaise pour dame d’une autre époque.

11

Des pieds délicats, un corps tout en courbes, floral et jaune.

12

Ce n’est pas Claire écrasée sur le bord du trottoir.


13

Le nom de Claire est Claire.

14

L’ambulance et la benne à ordures sont blanches.

15

Blanc n’efface pas jaune.

16

Blanc cassé.

17

Blond sale.

18

Un drôle d’oiseau jaune.

19

Drôle qui veut dire curieux qui veut dire étrange.


20

Un rire qui est jaune et qui a des dents.

21

Jaunes, les dents.

22

Jaune poussin, pas noir merle.

23

Deux œufs de merle.

24

Deux jaunes d’œufs de merle.

25

Il m’en faudrait trois, mais deux sonne mieux.

26

Je ne sais plus qui je suis.


27

Signé X, le nom de Claire.

28

Je suis Claire.

29

Je suis à côté d’une chaise.

30

Je ne ponds pas d’œufs…

31

… mais j’ai de mauvaises pensées que je dis.

32

Merle, c’est-à-dire petit homme.

33

Presque merde, presque perle.


34

Mon merle a perdu.

35

A perdu quoi  ?

36

Une coquille d’œuf.


37

Une coquille est une faute est une perle.

38

Ma séquence est presque finie.

39

J’aurai presque tout raté.

40

Claire est étourdie.

41

Elle tombe dans les pommes.

42

Puis elle tombe dans l’escalier.

43

Puis elle tombe amoureuse de son orthodontiste.

44

Des broches sur des dents qui vont dans tous les sens.

45

Claire, croque la pomme de discorde.

46

Croque-la, la pomme.

47

Life.

48

La-laa, laa-la-la.

49

Life is life.

50

La-laa, laa-la-la.



***

VIVE LA CLARTÉ  ! est tiré du recueil Mina Pam Dick, Traver Pam Dick, Nico Pam Dick et Gregoire Pam Dick (Le Quartanier, 2016).

Steve Savage Steve Savage is a poet and translator who lives in Montréal. His latest books are, in French, DDA – Ducasse, Dostoïevski, Artaud (Le Quartanier, 2018) and, in English, John Smith (Baillat Studio, 2018).


Simon Brown is a poet, translator and interdisciplinary artist currently living in Québec’s Montérégie-Est region. His French and English texts have been presented via platforms such as Poetry is Dead, Vallum, Watts, Lemon Hound, Train, Le Sabord and Estuaire. As a translator, he has adapted texts by Angela Carr, Maude Pilon, Gary Barwin and Alice Burdick, among others. His collections and artist’s books have been published in Québec, Canada and France by Vanloo, Moult, Le laps, squint press, and Paper Pusher.